Tag Archives: evolution

International Meeting “Evolutionary Theory: A Hierarchical Perspective”

Presentation of:

Eldredge N, Pievani T, Serrelli E, Tëmkin I, eds. (2016). Evolutionary Theory: A Hierarchical Perspective. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

With Telmo Pievani, Ilya Tëmkin, Warren D. Allmon, Gregory Cooper, T. Ryan Gregory, Stefan Linquist, William Miller III, Mihaela Pavlicev, Andrea Parravicini, Francesco Suman, Alejandro Fabregas Tejeda.

Organized by: The Hierarchy Group

Venues: National Academy of Sciences and NOVA Northern Virginia Community College

See event program on Academia.

Evolutionary Theory: A Hierarchical Perspective

9780226426228OUT NOW!

Eldredge N, Pievani T, Serrelli E, Tëmkin I, eds. (2016). Evolutionary Theory: A Hierarchical Perspective. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Continue reading Evolutionary Theory: A Hierarchical Perspective

Macroevolution: Explanation, Interpretation, Evidence

Serrelli E, Gontier N, eds. (forthcoming). Macroevolution: Explanation, Interpretation and Evidence. Springer.
Serrelli E, Gontier N, eds. Macroevolution: Explanation, Interpretation and Evidence. Springer.

OUT NOW!!!

  • Provides a unique multidisciplinary approach to understand macroevolution
  • Presents state of the art scientific methodologies
  • Written by international experts from different fields

This book is divided in two parts, the first of which shows how, beyond paleontology and systematics, macroevolutionary theories apply key insights from ecology and biogeography, developmental biology, biophysics, molecular phylogenetics, and even the sociocultural sciences to explain evolution in deep time. In the second part, the phenomenon of macroevolution is examined with the help of real life-history case studies on the evolution of eukaryotic sex, the formation of anatomical form and body-plans, extinction and speciation events of marine invertebrates, hominin evolution and species conservation ethics.
The book brings together leading experts, who explain pivotal concepts such as Punctuated Equilibria, Stasis, Developmental Constraints, Adaptive Radiations, Habitat Tracking, Turnovers, (Mass) Extinctions, Species Sorting, Major Transitions, Trends, and Hierarchies – key premises that allow macroevolutionary epistemic frameworks to transcend microevolutionary theories that focus on genetic variation, selection, migration and fitness.
Along the way, the contributing authors review ongoing debates and current scientific challenges; detail new and fascinating scientific tools and techniques that allow us to cross the classic borders between disciplines; demonstrate how their theories make it possible to extend the Modern Synthesis; present guidelines on how the macroevolutionary field could be further developed; and provide a rich view of just how it was that life evolved across time and space. In short, this book is a must-read for active scholars and, because the technical aspects are fully explained, it is also accessible for non-specialists.
Understanding evolution requires a solid grasp of above-population phenomena. Species are real biological individuals, and abiotic factors impact the future course of evolution. Beyond observation, when the explanation of macroevolution is the goal, we need both evidence and theory that enable us to explain and interpret how life evolves at the grand scale.

Table of contents

Preface and Acknowledgements by the Editors

1. Emanuele Serrelli and Nathalie Gontier – Introduction: Macroevolutionary Issues and Approaches in Evolutionary Biology

Part 1: Macroevolutionary Explanations and Interpretations

2. Douglas J. Futuyma – Can Modern Evolutionary Theory Explain Macroevolution?

3. Folmer Bokma – Evolution as a Largely Autonomous Process

4. Emanuele Serrelli – Visualizing Macroevolution: From Adaptive Landscapes to Compositions of Multiple Spaces

5. Stanley S. Salthe – Toward a Natural Philosophy of Macroevolution

6. Ilya Tëmkin and Niles Eldredge – Networks and Hierarchies: Approaching Complexity in Evolutionary Theory

7. Nathalie Gontier – Uniting Micro- with Macroevolution into an Extended Synthesis: Reintegrating Life’s Natural History into Evolution Studies

Part 2: Evidencing Macroevolution with Case Studies

8. Lutz Becks and Yasaman Alavi – Using Microevolution to Explain the Macroevolutionary Observations for the Evolution of Sex

9. Alycia L. Stigall – Speciation: Expanding the Role of Biogeography and Niche Breadth in Macroevolutionary Theory

10. Alessandro Minelli – Morphological Misfits and the Architecture of Development

11. Bernard Wood and Mark Grabowski – Macroevolution In and Around the Hominin Clade

12. Elena Casetta and Jorge Marques da Silva – Facing the Big Sixth: From Prioritizing Species to Conserving Biodiversity


Look for it in the Publications page (with additional links):

Serrelli E, Gontier N, eds. (2015). Macroevolution: Explanation, Interpretation and Evidence. Springer. ISBN 978-3-319-15044-4 [DOI 10.1007/978-3-319-15045-1] [BOA] [Ac] [RG]

See the book webpage.

Evolution: Selfish Genes or Universal Cooperation?

A worker Harpegnathos saltator (a jumping ant) engaged in battle with a rival colony's queen. From WIKIPEDIA. Uploaded by Waldir, June 3, 2006.
A worker Harpegnathos saltator (a jumping ant) engaged in battle with a rival colony’s queen. From WIKIPEDIA. Uploaded by Waldir, June 3, 2006.

Life has been evolving on Earth for billions years. Explaining evolution drives scientists towards entities that are far from our everyday experience. We will ask: are organisms vehicles for their genes competing “egoistically” and incessantly with each other to be replicated in future generations? Is there an “Earth system” that maintains equlibrium through the birth, metabolism, and death of all living beings? We will compare influent pictuers by great thinkers – Richard Dawkins, James Lovelock, Lynn Margulis. By discussing them, we will look into contemporary research in evolutionary biology.


Look for it in the Talks page (with additional links):

2015, Feb 10 (h.20:00) – Circolo UAAR di Varese, Globe Cafè, Varese, IT: Evoluzione: geni egoisti o cooperazione universale?. Scientific Cafè.

Language and Imagination in Teaching Education

I am interviewed by Manuela Campanelli in the online version of the important Italian national newspaper, Corriere.it, February 19, 2014.

Article title: “I ragazzi e i misteri dell’evoluzione «È un po’ come i Pokemon?» Usare i linguaggi e l’immaginazione dei più giovani per avvicinarli nel modo corretto a concetti scientifici complessi“.

Read it on Academia.

Evo-comix

“Evo-comix” talk by Marcello Sala and Emanuele Serrelli, at the 2014 Darwin Day, February 12 @ Museo di Storia Naturale, Milan.

Date/Time:
Wed, February 12, 2014
9:00 AM
Location:
Museo di Storia Naturale di Milano
Corso Venezia 55
Milano

Details:

Evolution is everywhere. Do we actually realize it? Can we distinguish its effects? Can we realize the complexity of its ways? The Darwin Day this year takes us behind the scenes of evolution, to find out how research transforms itself and merge into a variety of representations around us from the daily work of museum curators to science fiction books, movies and comics.

PROGRAMMA

ore 9.00
Indirizzi di saluto
Filippo del Corno ASSESSORE ALLA CULTURA COMUNE DI MILANO
Domenico Piraina DIRETTORE POLO MOSTRE E MUSEI SCIENTIFICI

ore 9.30
Il cinema e Darwin
Elena Canadelli UNIVERSITÀ DEGLI STUDI DI PADOVA

ore 10.00
Letteratura ed evoluzione
Andrea Varani CENTRO FILIPPO BUONARROTI

ore 10.30
Evo-comix
Emanuele Serrelli UNIVERSITÀ DEGLI STUDI MILANO BICOCCA / PIKAIA
Marcello Sala SCIENZA UNDER 18

ore 11.00
Fantascienza ed evoluzione
Daniele Barbieri FORMATORE
Moderatori:
Maurizio Casiraghi UNIVERSITÀ DEGLI STUDI MILANO BICOCCA / SIBE
Enrica Torretta LICEO CARDUCCI, MILANO
SALE ESPOSITIVE

ore 11.45, ore 12.15 e ore 12.45
Conservatori e ricercatori incontrano il pubblico
15 minuti di…

  • SALA 7 – I dinosauri che presero il volo
    Cristano Dal Sasso MSNM
  • SALA 9 – Cosa non è l’evoluzione umana
    Anna Alessandrello MSNM
  • SALA 10 – Conchiglia addio…voglio nuotare
    Monica Leonardi MSNM
  • SALA 13 – Lucrezia Borgia chi? Il veleno degli anfibi e dei
    rettili
    Stefano Scali MSNM
  • SALA 14 – La saga dei vegetali
    Gabriele Galasso MSNM
  • SALA 18 – Ossa ed evoluzione
    Giorgio Bardelli e Michela Podestà MSNM
    SALA CONFERENZE

ore 14.30
Comunicare la scienza
Silvia Bencivelli GIORNALISTA SCIENTIFICO
Marco Ferrari GIORNALISTA SCIENTIFICO
Moderatore:
Marco Ferraguti UNIVERSITÀ DEGLI STUDI DI MILANO / SIBE

ore 15.15
Ipse dixit: la rivincita di Aristotele
Alfredo Castelli GIORNALISTA E SCENEGGIATORE DI FUMETTI
Moderatore: Giorgio Chiozzi MSNM
SALE ESPOSITIVE

ore 16.15, ore 16.45 e ore 17.15
Conservatori e ricercatori incontrano il pubblico
15 minuti di…

  • SALA 8 – Il bello dell’evoluzione
    Giorgio Teruzzi e Alessandro Garassino MSNM
  • SALA 9 – Narrazione del futuro
    Daniele Barbieri FORMATORE
  • SALA 11 – Piccolo mondo antico: gli insetti dalle origini a oggi
    Fabrizio Rigato, Michele Zilioli, Maurizio Pavesi MSNM
  • SALA 12 – Barriera corallina
    Maurizio Casiraghi UNIVERSITÀ DEGLI STUDI MILANO BICOCCA / SIBE
    Francesca Benzoni UNIVERSITÀ DEGLI STUDI MILANO BICOCCA
  • SALA 16 – Il Dodo: fantasia e realtà di un uccello “quasi” mitico
    Giorgio Chiozzi MSNM
    SALA CONFERENZE

ore 17.45
IL GRANDE RACCONTO DELL’EVOLUZIONE UMANA
Giorgio Manzi UNIVERSITÀ DEGLI STUDI DI ROMA LA SAPIENZA
Presentano:
Giovanni Caprara GIORNALISTA RCS
Anna Alessandrello MSNM


Look for it in the Talks page (with additional links):

2014, Feb 12 (h.10:30) – Centro Filippo Buonarroti, Natural History Museum, Milan, IT: Evo-comix. With Marcello Sala. Talk.

http://www.slideshare.net/eserrelli/evocomix

http://darwinday.org/events/darwinday2014_msnm/

Evolution: all in the family

MMT_Volantino A5_fronteLook for this teaching material on Academia.edu.

La vita sulla Terra è una grande famiglia allargata. Noi esseri umani siamo davvero imparentati non soltanto con ogni essere vivente del mondo, ma anche con ogni essere mai vissuto sulla Terra. Lo stand “Evoluzione: tutti in famiglia” dà la possibilità a ogni visitatore di scegliere un organismo appartenente a una specie che preferisce, sedersi e calcolare il “grado di cuginanza” che lo collega a sé. Il calcolo si esegue seguendo semplici istruzioni riportate sulla scheda “do it yourself”. Le istruzioni comprendono la ricerca di alcune semplici informazioni su Internet. Al termine della ricerca, che dura pochi minuti, il visitatore riceve un “certificato di cuginanza” stampato al momento. Grazie a un’estrazione a premi al termine della giornata, poi, pochi fortunati tra tutti i partecipanti possono vincere una delle magliette “Evolution: all in the family”.

Evo-poster-small
La metodologia utilizzata si basa sul conteggio del numero approssimativo di generazioni umane e non-umane trascorse dall’epoca dell’antenato comune. È esattamente come calcolare una genealogia standard, però estesa oltre le generazioni umane, alle migliaia e milioni di generazioni del resto del mondo vivente. Lo stand è dotato di una grande e colorata immagine dell’albero della vita, che serve sia da attrattiva per i visitatori, sia da mappa per impostare il conteggio delle generazioni.
Lo stand è realizzato in collaborazione con “Evogeneao – Teaching evolution through life’s genealogy” (Medford, Oregon, U.S.A.). Con l’occasione, si realizzerà una traduzione in italiano e una messa online dei testi didattici del sito http://www.evogeneao.com/, con menzione dell’Università di Milano Bicocca e di MEETmeTONIGHT.


Look for it in the Talks page (with additional links):

2013, Sep 27 (h.10-24) – MeetMeTonight – Faccia a faccia con la ricerca, The Universities of Milan, IT: Evoluzione: tutti in famiglia. With Marcello Sala. Lab.

http://www.evogeneao.com

A new look at the Extended Evolutionary Synthesis

emanuele-sibe2013I present the initiatives, papers, and ideas of Pigliucci, Müller, and others, who are proposing an Extended Evolutionary Synthesis (EES). I then advance some reasons for concern raised by those claims, including uncertainties in timing, historical inaccuracies, lack of a theoretical structure, arbitrariness and instability of the included concepts, stereotypical characterization of the Modern Synthesis, and dissent among evolutionary biologists. Then I mention the studies by historian of the Modern Synthesis, Joe Cain, who is very detailed and careful in explaining that Mayr, Dobzhansky, Huxley & co. who claimed they were part of a Modern Synthesis, they did also for strategic and political reasons, related to their own careers and to more general cultural battles of the time. What I want to argue is not that the Modern Synthesis was an invented product of a marketing operation; rather, it is that the social and interactive dynamics of science are very important in understanding what is going on. The same could be true for the EES in our years. I maintain the primary importance of understanding how biology is today, how it has changed, what future expects us. Pigliucci’s question, “Do we need an EES?”, thus suggests very important issues. But I propose that we shouldn’t take at face value what the protagonists of evolutionary biology see and say. The ‘expert review’ or the ‘small group of architects’ methods cannot work. No solution either comes from a traditional philosophical approach of ‘describing the structure of evolutionary theory’, because scientists don’t work ‘inside’ theories; they use them in different ways. Correct methods for answering could be developed, with the help of advanced technology for analyzing the scientific literature, the ways of doing science, the ‘hot topics’, the birth and death of fields, etc., through time. This would mean to look seriously at the scientific community, avoiding, on t he one hand, the authority principle, and, on the other hand, the surrender to an ‘all flows, everything ever changes’ perspective. In the context of such an endeavour, I suggest a specific look at the Italian evolutionary biology community as important for the future prospects of this science in our country.


Look for it in the Publications page (with additional links):

Serrelli E (2013). A new look at the Extended Evolutionary Synthesis. 5th congress of the Italian Society for Evolutionary Biology (SIBE). Trento, Faculty of Lettere and MUSE Museum, Italy, August 28-31. [http://hdl.handle.net/10281/46363]

Interviews at the Lisbon Summer School on Evolution

These interviews were conducted at the 2013 International Summer School on Evolution which was organized by the Applied Evolutionary Epistemology Lab in collaboration with Ciência Viva, and held at Ciência Viva’s Pavilion of Knowledge in Lisbon, Portugal.

In the following first video I was interviewed on Philosophy of Biology, the Extended Synthesis, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Niche Construction, Macroevolution, Symbiogenesis and the Gaia Hypothesis and Niche Construction.

In the second video the School teachers were asked to give their definition of evolution: these were Bruce Lieberman, Folmer Bokma, Michael Arnold, Luis Villarreal, Frietson Galis, Ilya Tëmkin, Mónica Tamariz, Marion Blute, Fiona Jordan, Michael Ruse, Derek Turner, Frédéric Bouchard, Emanuele Serrelli and Nathalie Gontier. The AppEEL You Tube channel features full interviews with these and other scholars.

See the post on my and Nathalie’s course: Modeling sociocultural evolution.

More info can be found at:

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Sponsored by:

  • John Templeton Foundation
  • Ciência Viva Ciência Viva Knowledge Pavilion
  • Centre for Philosophy of Science of the University of Lisbon
  • Faculty of Science of the University of Lisbon
  • University of Lisbon